Genetic inheritance: from the missionary who ventured to the teenager who climbed and flew down Mount Everest

2022-05-04 0 By

A few years ago, when I was collecting information on paragliding history, I came across a brief passage on some mountaineering websites:On October 7, 1990, Frenchman Jean-Noel Roche and his 17-year-old son Bertrand Roche reached the summit and parachuted down the mountain.I wondered what kind of father would take a 17-year-old to climb Mount Everest and then fly off it.I had many search on the Internet, find a documentary about the two, the documentary is French, I was completely don’t understand French, but it is only the picture is enough to my surprise, a documentary of the child is only 12 years old, but followed her father climbing wall, after arriving at the top of the cliff, the child should “fly” the wind, fly alone down…What kind of father would put his child at risk like that?Knowing his childhood history, it was no surprise to learn that as an adult, he and his wife had climbed the highest mountains on the seven continents and parachuted down.I was more curious about the father, Jean-Noel Roche.Chinese websites could only find references to his climbing to the top of Mount Qomolangma and paragliding, while English websites had only fragmentary information, so I had to try a French search. Finally, I read a French book published in 1986, which gave me a basic understanding of him and his family.The reason why I am so curious and inquisitive is that I want to have a deeper understanding of why adventure culture prevails in Europe and France, so many people play extreme sports, and how they embark on the road of adventure.It takes three generations to make a gentleman, so an explorer doesn’t just pop out of a stone…In the story of Jean-Noel Roush’s expedition, a familiar name appears, Roger Fillon. (This name is mentioned in many public articles in the country when they write “in a flash” about paragliding history, but…)This is exactly what I expected before READING the book, expecting to find some fragments in the book that I was looking for.The title of the book is Pap'S et Zebulon (Dad and Zebulon).Zebulon was the nickname of my son Bertrand Roche, and I had to wrestle with it to figure out what it meant until I asked my friends in France,In the plancing character of Le Manege Enchante, Zebulon, little Bertrand is as energetic, indefatigable, and energetic as in the cartoon.The book was signed by Jean-Noel Roch and his older brother Claude Roche, who, according to the introduction, wrote the book primarily.The book came about after a 1985 documentary film of the same name about father and son Jean-Noel and Zebrun climbing and parasol flying in Yosemite and the Black Canyon attracted a lot of attention and someone suggested that Jean-Noel write a book.Director:Philippe Lallet I saw a few years ago is the documentary, but now broadcast links have failed – el no courage to write a book, at the right moment, his second brother Claude familiar with their experiences, and even some adventures he also involved, and accept the challenge, Claude told us the story of rosh family for generations.Start with their great-grandparents.A great grandparent of missionary exploration, a Wikipedia character, Isidore Clut.Isidore Krut, a 19th-century missionary who left his native France to preach in the far North, visited his parents only once in more than 30 years, according to the book.In the 18th and 19th centuries, science and religion became another motivation for people to leave their comfortable homes for trials and tribulations in difficult, and often dangerous, places, he writes in his introduction to The History of Human Exploration (royal Geographical Society, DK Company).In the introduction to “A History of Human Mountaineering” (by the Royal Geographical Society and the Alpine Mountaineering Club), the world’s mountains have been largely inaccessible for thousands of years.Home to gods and monsters, mountains were considered dangerous, desolate, and mysterious places, shunned by all but a few merchants and religious people who longed for solitude.Because of the surname difference, I assumed that the Bishop of Kruth might have been their grandfather’s uncle.Claude goes on to write about their grandfather, an elder bishop whose adventures in the Far North planted the seeds of his dreams as a young boy.Before bicycles became fashionable, the young grandfather had crossed the sea south, across Corsica and as far north as Holland on his two wheels, and on weekends he would ride his bicycle in search of Alpine flowers, mushrooms and beautiful scenery…The grandfather loved life, music and the outdoors.His children, Jean-Noel and Claude’s father and his brothers, were encouraged by their father to enjoy nature and went hiking during the holidays with a teacher who organized hiking trips, so they had access to some of the tools used for climbing.Father these the time spent in the mountains of youth, became the inexhaustible source of the story, in time for the children tell, these experience has become a legend, to become the epic, and his father, let – el and Claude’s grandfather, even by some apotheosis, his portrait was high up in – fireplace el home after marriage.There is a picture of Ozawa bulun sitting on a wooden beam in his home with a portrait of his great-grandfather.The great-grandfather could not have imagined that a few years later, his great-grandson would become the youngest man to reach the summit of Mount Everest, and the first father-son team to reach the summit at the same time as his father, so they would be in the Guinness Book of Records.His great-grandson and his wife reached the summit from the other side of the mountain, becoming the first Frenchman to reach the summit via the north and south sides.The father Claude describes in his book seems to have no sense of direction, just like me.But what he likes with his wife and children to spend the holiday in the mountains, he want to lead you back to twenty years ago and his brothers walked the road, the real memory with his stories about the legend of the dozens, hundreds of times, so that it is difficult to identify those roads and peaks, but it is so familiar with, he inevitably lost…’Endless discussions began between my father, who knew the way, and my mother, who observed the terrain, and we almost always came to an impasse,’ Mr. Clode writes.But when Claude looked back, he saw its value.If his father had a better sense of direction, he thought, maybe they wouldn’t have heard so many good stories.If his father is a good guide, the mountain trip will be plain sailing, and they have less experience the adventure, along with often lost father, they are in the danger, Claude think that even if the father is not intentionally, at least he unknowingly cause trouble, let you become stronger, and proved that he has enough power to deal with,Their adventures never ended in tragedy, though they were always tortuous.A father with eight Claude and ten years old, the firstborn of Bernard (Bernard) originally common route to go, plans to return to at noon, the result is still in the mountains at six o ‘clock in the afternoon, the two brothers stood on the ridge, haven’t eat, but fear erase everything, a storm is approaching, they dare not to complain, looking at the foot of the mountain of chardonnay bharata,Waiting for their father to lead them out of trouble.If Zebrun could have seen them, clode writes, standing close to the rock in an easy passage for him, he might have smiled derisively.Zebron learned the art of cliff climbing early, and while he was still in his cradle, he had an experienced guide.In front of little Claude and his brother stood an unskilled man, teaching them about life and injecting them with small doses of the dangers that were essential to survival.He also wrote: ‘Our father was never a good guide, but because of his mistakes, he was undoubtedly an irreplaceable teacher.’The most remarkable thing about him is that he passed the spirit of adventure to his children. He made them feel frustrated in these adventure games and led them to work together to overcome difficulties.Claude said he was grateful to his father for getting them into those special states so early in life that the primordial forces of life were stored in their bodies.When Claude realized this trait in his brother, Jean-Noel, and in all of them, he wanted to understand how it had happened.One day, he asked his father what his ideal life had been.The father replied, Explorers.Perhaps it was this unfulfilled dream that led him to play the role of explorer every time he went into the mountains, and the children loved the game.Their mother came from a family that didn’t play much sport, but she was a hard-working person who left school at 13 to work at home, carrying boxes of cheese to her father’s truck and helping her ailing mother with the housework in the evenings.Hiking in the mountains and skiing in winter were her escape from daily life. Meeting these outdoor enthusiasts changed her perspective.Their father noticed the tireless, uncomplaining young girl, and he introduced her to the joys he found in the mountains and skiing. She was willing to learn.She went to a ski race and won.She follows her sons everywhere, goes to places only “supermommy” can go, and celebrates her 60th birthday on top of a mountain in Peru, 5, 000 meters above sea level, and never gives up on a long ski trip every spring, no matter what.The children saw courage and tenacity in her.The stories of the first three generations range from exploring for faith, to longing, to incorporating small adventures into everyday life.And by the fourth generation, especially with Jean-Noel, mountain guides had become his life’s work.He was born at the right time and had a childhood that was the envy of his two older brothers.He was taken to the mountains before his two brothers because his parents already had a car when he was born.When Jean-Noel was seven months old, their father led them up the mountain. The two older brothers carried their father’s custom-made ice axes while jean-Noel carried them in his father’s backpack.When he was four, he went skiing in the Alps with his parents, while his two older brothers had to stay at school.Their hometown Arnold nai (Annonay), is a mountain city surrounded by mountains, it will snow in winter, the whole family of their father side will be sent to go skiing, but the conditions of skiing, Arnold nai cannot be compared to the Alps, in the eyes of my two brothers, the Alps is they all want to go to is hard to get to heaven, and is only 4 years old brother,He spent a week at the foot of Mont Blanc, which was enough to make his brothers jealous.Jean Noel did not participate much in the wild, slightly dangerous outings his father took his brothers on, too young to protect everyone with his old ropes, and his father grew less daring as he grew older.Jean-noel often waited at the bottom of the mountain, which made his desire to climb stronger and stronger.Father will accompany him to play another game, he climbed into the kitchen of the bench and then stood on the shoulders of her father, father started gymnastics when I was young, he was willing to play with the children some gymnastics games, every night before going to bed, let – north el all want to climb on his father’s shoulders, her hands rested on her hips stand up straight, on the site for a while, and then wait to father holding his hands with both hands,He would flip upside down and land on his feet, which has become a bedtime ritual.One day when the father came home from the gym, he told their mother that he was arranging a program for a festival event. He planned to make a three-tiered pyramid with a young man standing on top, but no one dared to do so.His little son said, Father, I can go.The mother thought it was dangerous, but the father thought it was ok.Then, before the age of five, Jean-Noel managed to perform his act in front of people, his picture was in the newspapers, and he was commented on for his courage.In mountaineering, his elder brother Bernard became Jean-Noel’s first mentor.Bernard understood early on the need to learn mountaineering techniques.After finishing his studies, he trained with a university mountaineering team and practiced skiing during the winter as an instructor at a ski club.His expertise replaced dad’s improvisation, allowing the group to tackle more difficult rock walls without risk.But the eldest brother had his own journey, and he left home to climb Mount Elbrus, the highest mountain in the Greater Caucasus.Jean Noel gathered a few friends to form a peer group at Annonay, and with one outing after another, he really got into mountaineering.As the most obsessed and gifted man, he became an avid lead climber, leading his companions to climb all over the rocks in the area.In the summer of 1966, at the age of 17, Jean-Noel organized a two-week trek in the Alps with friends to reach the summit of La Meije, 3,984m above sea level.On the way down, perhaps the joy of reaching the summit had distracted his attention, and Noel made a mistake. He slipped and fell, unconscious, but his helpless body rolled to a halt a few meters from the edge of the cliff, or there would have been no story.Thirty-six summers later, in August 2002, Jean-Noel was killed while descending the Matterohorn/Cervin.Paragliding and the Dangerous Matterhorn before that, he had a long, long, high way to go in these extraordinary 36 years…He will also lead a teenager to the top of the world and fly into the void.To be continued…